Where The Rainbow Fell Down

Author: Lynette Robinson
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Stock information

General Fields

  • : $30.00(NZD)
  • : 9780473233389
  • : BJ & LM Coker Family Trust
  • : BJ & LM Coker Family Trust
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  • :
  • : January 2013
  • : 220x158mm
  • : New Zealand
  • : 29.95
  • : March 2013
  • :
  • : books

Special Fields

  • :
  • :
  • : Lynette Robinson
  • :
  • : Paperback
  • :
  • :
  • : 362.76092
  • :
  • : 280
  • :
  • : Black and white
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Barcode 9780473233389
9780473233389

Description

A memoir in two parts. The first half of the story details Lynette's life growing up in mid-century New Zealand. Born into a dysfunctional NZ Catholic family with a disturbed mother, a controlling father, and an abusive step father, she was raised in the post war climate. Political and historical events helped influence and shape her. After leaving home to work at the age of 14, she was coerced into marriage at 18 to a calculating, older man. After years of marital unhappiness, she began a career as a Marriage Guidance Counsellor, and found unexpected love, joy and escape with a Catholic Priest. Second half of the story - the priest's tale unfolds. Brian was the only child of an introverted mother preoccupied with concealing her deformity, and a passive father who 'went with the flow.' As a young naive man he was easily coerced into the priesthood and spent years of training in the Seminary where young men were conditioned and shaped for their role, their sexual natures suppressed, attitudes to women distorted, and their loyalty to the Church made absolute. Brian questioned all of this but continued. Brian forms a relationship that challenges his Catholic conditioning and he determines to leave the priesthood. His struggle to escape the Church and the pressures placed on him to remain, tested this relationship, but both remained firm.

Reviews

"The narrative of this sometimes shocking memoir shows an embracing understanding of the frailty of human existence and the loves and losses we all share. In particular it portrays the challenges New Zealanders faced throughout the developing post-war years, eventually evolving into a better life for all." - TGCM, The General Consensus